2022 ALPINE REHAB CONFERENCE EDUCATORS

Please get to know our highly skilled, and experienced educators who have graciously accepted the call to pass on their knowledge to us. They come from across the U.S., and several have experience outside of North America.


Michelle Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS – Access to Independence

About the Instructor

Michelle is an occupational therapist with over 31 years of experience and has been in private practice, Access to Independence, for over 11 years. She is a well-respected lecturer, both nationally and internationally and has authored numerous texts, chapters, and articles. She is the co-editor of Seating and Wheeled Mobility: a clinical resource guide, editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., NRRTS Continuing Education Curriculum Coordinator and Clinical Editor of NRRTS Directions magazine. Michelle is a RESNA Fellow and member of the Clinician Task Force. Michelle is a certified ATP, certified SMS and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the ABDA.

Courses

Positioning Kids – So Much More Than Smaller Equipment (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 6 | Track A | 8:00am-10:00am | .2 CEU’S
Pediatric Power Mobility (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 6 | Track A | 10:15am-12:15pm | .2 CEU’S
Secondary Supports – It’s All in the Angles (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 7 | Track A | 10:15am-12:15pm | .2 CEU’S
Dynamic Seating – Providing Movement for Clinical Benefit (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 7 | Track A | 1:30pm-3:30pm | .2 CEU’S

Descriptions

Positioning Kids – So Much More Than Smaller Equipment (.2 CEU’s)
Michelle Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS
Positioning children is not the same as positioning adults. Children grow in stature, but other changes occur with this growth including range of motion, muscle tone, orthopedic status, functional abilities, and more. Pediatric seating must meet the child’s needs today and in the future. This course will address positioning children and review product options specifically designed for kids.
Pediatric Power Mobility (.2 CEU’s)
Michelle Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS
This course presents pediatric power mobility, including the importance of early mobility, determining readiness, assessment, and mobility training. Research has linked early mobility to specific developmental skills. Assessment strategies determine readiness and identify needs and product parameters. If you work with clients who are not mobile, this course will help you determine if a client is an appropriate candidate for a power wheelchair, participate in an assessment and optimize skills through mobility training.
Secondary Supports – It’s All in the Angles (.2 CEU’s)
Michelle Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS
All wheelchair seating systems have some sort of seat and back surface. We may add some lateral supports, as well, such as lateral trunk supports. But what about those secondary supports? Supports such as pelvic belts, anterior trunk supports, and ankle straps are often seen as limiting movement and function – and sometimes even labeled as a restraint. This course will explore secondary supports and appropriate clinical applications. We will also discuss what to do when secondary supports are required, and team members have restraint concerns. Case studies will be included.
Dynamic Seating – Providing Movement for Clinical Benefit (.2 CEU’s)
Michelle Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS
Dynamic Seating is movement which occurs within the seating system and/or wheelchair frame in response to client force. Dynamic components absorb force and return the client to a starting position. When the client moves, the dynamic seating moves with the client, maintaining alignment with the seating system for postural support and stability. Clients who extend within the seating system or seek out movement may benefit from dynamic seating. Dynamic components absorb and diffuse force, protecting both the client from pain and injury and the wheelchair seat and frame from damage. Absorbing force may reduce active extension. Providing movement can increase alertness and decrease agitation. Movement can also improve function and postural control. This webinar will define dynamic seating, as well as the clinical benefits of this intervention. A variety of product options and features will be reviewed in order to better match these features to a specific client’s needs. Case studies will be used throughout.

Curt Prewitt MS, PT, ATP – Director of Education

About the Instructor

Curt Prewitt is Director of Education for Ki Mobility.  He has a BS in Exercise Physiology and an MS in Physical Therapy from the University of Colorado. He practiced as a physical therapist in a number of settings for a few years, most prominently in long term care, where he gained experience with seating and wheeled mobility.  He transitioned from a practicing therapist to a manufacturer’s representative, eventually moving into sales management and focusing on complex rehab technology.  Throughout his tenure on the manufacturer’s side in the complex rehab arena, he has dealt largely with pediatric positioning and mobility products.  He has previously also served as a product trainer/product specialist, teaching product features and clinical application, as well as coordinating continuing education presentations, both credited and non-credited.  He has presented educational courses across the US and internationally.

Courses

How Do People Actually Use Their Manual Wheelchairs and What Really Matters (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 8:00am – 9:00am | .1 CEUs
The Wheel Story – The Impact of Wheels & Tires on Wheelchair Propulsion (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 9:00am – 10:00am | .1 CEUs

Descriptions

How Do People Actually Use Their Manual Wheelchairs and What Really Matters (.1 CEU)
Curt Prewitt, MS, PT, ATP
Every manual wheelchair user would like their chair to be a high-performance machine. Performance is impacted by principles involved in translating human movement into movement of a wheelchair and factors that contribute to energy loss. In order to help end users achieve maximum performance, persons involved in the wheelchair selection process need to have a fundamental understanding of how people use their wheelchairs, and how those wheelchairs function. This presentation will examine the real-world behaviors of manual wheelchair users and discuss the mechanical principles and factors that affect propulsion efficiency. In addition to explaining some details of the science involved, we hope to inspire participants to think critically about their current understandings and beliefs on this topic.
The Wheel Story – The Impact of Wheels & Tires on Wheelchair Propulsion (.1 CEU)
Curt Prewitt, MS, PT, ATP
Imagine a meticulously configured ultralightweight rigid manual wheelchair, set-up for the user’s anatomic measurements, postural support needs, and skill level. The wheelchair has an aggressive axle position and is stripped down of secondary components, such as anti-tippers, armrests or even wheel locks. The end user is expecting a highly efficient, high-performance wheelchair. Now, imagine the chair being issued equipped with mag wheels and pneumatic tires with flat-free inserts. Research is giving us new insights into the impact of wheel and tire selection as a critical influencer of performance. Are we considering the right factors and context when it comes to wheel and tire selection? Wheel and tire selection on manual wheelchairs often comes down to choosing the standard, no-additional-cost option, or may be based on an assumption that a user is not able or willing to maintain wheels and tires that require it. Are we providing end users an explanation of what to consider, and giving them the options to determine how much maintenance they are willing to accept? An understanding of materials, and the physical and performance characteristics of wheels and tires, can contribute to improved decision making regarding the selection of a critical aspect of wheeled mobility: the wheeled part. This presentation will address the science of wheels and tires and review current research findings on the impact of selection and setup on wheelchair performance and propulsion efficiency. Attendees will be provided practical considerations to equip them to make appropriate wheel and tire selection when configuring manual wheelchairs.

Sarah Lusto, PT, ATC, ATP – Clinical Education Manager

About the Instructor

Sarah received her BS in sports medicine and MS in Physical Therapy from Quinnipiac University. For the past 12 years, she has worked at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West Orange, New Jersey on both the brain injury and spinal cord injury units where she gained extensive experience in neuro rehabilitation. As a clinical specialist at Kessler, she also served as the wheelchair team lead for the inpatient department and member of the outpatient wheelchair clinic team where she specialized in wheelchair seating and mobility along with assistive technology.  Now working for Permobil, Sarah is providing education and clinical support as a Regional Clinical Education Manager

Courses

Wheelchair Configuration – The Importance of an Optimized Ride (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 10:15am – 11:15pm | .1 CEU’s
Wheeled Mobility Solutions for Older Adults (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 11:15am – 12:15pm | .1 CEU’s

Descriptions

Wheelchair Configuration – The Importance of an Optimized Ride (.1 CEU)
Sarah Lusto, PT, ATC, ATP
This course will address the recommendations set forth by the Consortium of Spinal Cord Medicine and RESNA to stress the importance of an optimally configured manual wheelchair.
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
1. Discuss 2 ways in which manual wheelchair configuration affects propulsion.
2. Discover 3 research articles that examine the implications of properly configured manual wheelchair.
3. Identify 2 “nontraditional” measurements that play a key role in optimally fitting a manual wheelchair.
4. Explain how a manual wheelchair that is durable, lightweight, and custom configured improves overall function of manual wheelchair users.
Wheeled Mobility Solutions for Older Adults (.1 CEU)
Sarah Lusto, PT, ATC, ATP
The purpose of this 1-hour interactive course is to consider practical strategies related to wheeled mobility evaluation and training for older adults. By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
1. Apply 3 clinical considerations for utilization of MWCs to benefit mobility and safety for someone who is aging or aging with a disability.
2. Apply 3 clinical rationale for recommendation of power assist technology or PWCs to benefit mobility and safety for someone who is aging or aging with a disability.
3. Describe 3 power seat functions that can assist someone who is aging or aging with a disability with independence and safety with mobility and activities of daily living.
4. Discuss 3 potential training techniques for successful use of seating and mobility equipment for someone who is aging or aging with a disability.

Jessica Presperin Pedersen, OTD, MBA, OTR/L, ATP/SMS – Director of Clinical Education

About the Instructor

With over 40 years of clinical practice as an OT, Doctor Jessica Presperin Pedersen has worked in all sectors of the wheelchair and seating industry as a master clinician, supplier, manufacturing consultant, design representative, and educator. Dr. Presperin Pedersen was a pioneer in the development of the profession of wheelchairs and seating in the 1980s and has spent the last two decades contributing to the research world to demonstrate evidence for knowledge translation in the clinic, advocacy, and product development. She in a RESNA and AOTA Fellow, serves on the Clinician Task Force, the Seating and Wheeled Mobility Committee for AOTA, and has shared her experiences internationally through publications and presentations

Courses

Pediatric Mobility and Positioning Throughout the day (.1 CEU)
Oct. 7 | Track B | 1:30pm – 2:30pm | .1 CEUs
Interventions for Primary Support Surfaces in the Seated Adult (.1 CEU)
Oct. 7 | Track B | 2:30pm – 3:30pm | .1 CEUs

Descriptions

Pediatric Mobility and Positioning Throughout the day (.1 CEU)
Jessica Pedersen, OTD, OTR/L, ATP/SMS
This session will provide an overview of ways to provide supported positioning using many developmental postures throughout the day. The social, psychological, physical, functional, and physiological benefits including research evidence, will be outlines. Mobility options including dependent, manual, and power options will be discussed.
Interventions for Primary Support Surfaces in the Seated Adult (.1 CEU)
Jessica Pedersen, OTD, OTR/L, ATP/SMS
This session will provide an overview of characteristics of body support surfaces, universal terminology, surface area support considerations, methods of providing pressure distribution, the importance of cooling, outcome measures for determining back supports for an active rider, and choices for posterior, lateral, and anterior trunk support.

Erin Maniaci, PT, DPT – Clinical Education Specialist

About the Instructor

Doctor Maniaci holds a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Missouri. She began her career in a Spinal Cord Injury rehab hospital where she grew her expertise in seating and education. She expanded upon that expertise working in outpatient neurology and as an educator for a local complex rehab supplier. Erin puts strong emphasis on building patient rapport and cultivating relationships.  She is a current Clinical Education Specialist with Motion Composites where she provides educational sessions throughout North America and internationally.

Courses

Client Centered Prescriptions – We Say It, But Are We Doing It? (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 1:30pm – 2:30pm | .1 CEUs
Changes with Age – Giving You the Justification for Custom Manual Wheelchairs for the Geriatric Client (.1 CEU)
Oct. 6 | Track B | 2:30pm – 3:30pm | .1 CEUs

Descriptions

Client Centered Prescriptions – We Say It, But Are We Doing It? (.1 CEU)
Erin Maniaci, PT, DPT
There are many elements which come into play when prescribing a wheelchair and it can be difficult to make sure you are truly staying client centered. This presentation will review the process of a wheelchair prescription while managing the client, therapist, dealer, and funding sources interests. We will highlight key points which lead to successful prescriptions as well as client satisfaction, decreasing risk of equipment abandonment. When prescribing equipment, we try to be as client centered as possible. However, it is a balancing act to make sure the goals of the client are being met while accommodating for therapeutic goals as well. How much of your prescription would you say is based on the client’s opinion and knowledge? What is the therapist’s opinion and knowledge? How much is the dealer’s opinion or motive? Or how much is based on the funding source?
Changes with Age – Giving You the Justification for Custom Manual Wheelchairs for the Geriatric Client (.1 CEU)
Erin Maniaci, PT, DPT
The geriatric client can be easily overlooked as one who could benefit from a custom fitting, ultralightweight, adjustable manual wheelchair. They are too often provided the “basic” wheelchair without much thought. This course with review normal physiological changes that come with aging, and how proper wheelchair seating, base selection, fitting, and set up, can be justified for the geriatric client.

Wade Lucas, PT, DPT, ATP/SMS – Clinical Education Manager

About the Instructor

Clinical Education Manager. Doctor Lucas is a licensed Physical Therapist and a certified Assistive Technology Professional (ATP)/Seating and Mobility Specialist (SMS) through RESNA. He has over 17 years of experience working in the complex rehabilitation equipment field. His clinical experience includes inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, pediatrics, skilled nursing/long term care, and home health. Wade’s current role with Quantum Rehab is to develop education programs on the clinical uses of company products and produce education presentations to provide to therapists and equipment providers.

Courses

Drivability – Features and Options to Promote Function and Independence (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 6 | Track A | 1:30pm – 3:30pm | .2 CEUs
Seating and Wheeled Mobility Considerations for the Bariatric Client (.2 CEU’s)
Oct. 7 | Track A | 8:00am – 10:00pm | .2 CEUs

Descriptions

Seating and Wheeled Mobility Considerations for the Bariatric Client (.2 CEU’s)
Wade Lucas, PT, DPT, ATP/SMS
More than one third of the population of the United States is considered obese. Obesity-related medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and stroke can lead to various levels of mobility impairments. These mobility impairments often require wheeled mobility as an alternative mobility approach to ambulation. Along with the secondary medical complications listed above, traumatic injuries and neuromuscular disorders (such as spinal cord injury, brain injury, muscular dystrophies) can present as a primary diagnosis requiring equipment with higher weight capacities. This course will discuss considerations of the bariatric wheeled mobility user while distinguishing the unique seating and mobility challenges that present with the bariatric client.
Drivability – Features and Options to Promote Function and Independence (.2 CEU’s)
Wade Lucas, PT, DPT, ATP/SMS
Drivability is defined as “the degree of smoothness and steadiness of acceleration”. When considering drivability in the terms of power wheelchair management, it is not only an extremely important factor for an end user’s safety in controlling the power wheelchair, but a huge consideration in the satisfaction and comfort of using the device. When evaluating an end user for a power mobility device, much consideration is given to the mobility base, seating components, and drive controls, but there are other features to consider as well. This course will look at these important additional features including programming options, suspension, and tracking technology.

Karen A. Lerner, RN, MSN, ATP, CWS / Regional Vice President, Pressure Prevention

About the Instructor

Karen is a registered nurse, wound care and rehab specialist with over 26 years of industry experience. She has extensive experience as a public speaker, educating DME providers and clinicians on a variety of topics. Karen’s speaking engagements included testifying before Congress on behalf of the HME industry. Since October 2013, Karen has worked as part of Team Pressure Prevention at Drive Medical. Prior to coming to Drive and for over 10 years, Karen was VP of Clinical Services at a Northeast based DME, responsible for Pressure Prevention, Respiratory and Rehab sales, as well as service and training. Before DME, Karen worked in sales for a hospital equipment and support surface manufacturer. She began her career as a critical care nurse specialist in major teaching hospitals from Florida to NJ. Karen received her undergraduate degree from Duke University and her graduate education from the University of Florida.

Courses

Bariatrics and Wound Care Considerations (.1 CEU)
Oct. 7 | Track B | 10:15am – 11:15am | .1 CEUs
Beyond the Wheelchair – Evidence Based Strategies for Preserving Mobility (.1 CEU)
Oct. 7 | Track B | 11:15am – 12:15am | .1 CEUs

Descriptions

Beyond the Wheelchair – Evidence Based Strategies for Preserving Mobility (.1 CEU)
Karen Lerner, RN, MSN, ATP, CWS
Mobility is critical for functioning well and living independently. Our clients who lose their mobility are less likely to remain living at home, have higher rates of disease, disability, hospitalization, and death. The benefits of mobility among hospitalized patients are well-known—decreased pressure injuries, deep vein thrombosis and functional decline. Manual wheelchair (MWC) users have increased risk for accelerated loss of function and mobility greatly limiting independence and quality of life. This program reviews important issues for preserving function and mobility for individuals by presenting the current available evidence and recommendations. Learning Objectives:
1.     Relate the financial, physical, and psychological impact of reduced mobility
2.     Summarize strategies for preserving mobility in elderly, aging, hospitalized patients, and other client populations
3.     Outline how to minimize loss of mobility associated with wheelchair use
Bariatrics and Wound Care Considerations (.1 CEU)
Karen Lerner, RN, MSN, ATP, CWS
Human dignity is an essential part of health care for all clients, including those who are obese. Like very underweight clients, bariatric patients are at risk for a multitude of difficult and costly to resolve skin conditions. This program will discuss strategies and present evidence to enhance the chances of successful outcomes for clinicians who care for bariatric clients and their skin. Learning Objectives:
1.     List at least 3 factors impacting skin issues of bariatric patients
2.     Define the scope and problem of pressure injuries and wound care associated with obesity and bariatrics
3.     Describe the solutions for choosing appropriate equipment to help care for the bariatric patient’s skin

Dan Fedor, Director of Reimbursement and Education at U.S. Rehab

About the Instructor

Dan has been in the HME industry for over 29 years and currently serves as the Director of Reimbursement for U.S. Rehab, a division of The VGM Group, Inc. He is a graduate of Penn State University, where he earned a BS in Economics. Dan joined VGM in 2014, and before that, was the Director of Education and Compliance for Pride Mobility/Quantum Rehab for 13 years. Prior to joining Pride, Dan served as the Director for Provider Outreach and Education (POE) and Electronic Data Interchange for the Jurisdiction A DME MAC (United Healthcare) for nearly six years. Dan has presented at numerous local and national events regarding Medicare compliance and reimbursement, including Medtrade, Heartland Conference, ISS, RESNA, and multiple state association meetings.

Course

Mobility Assistive Equip. – What’s Covered, What’s Not, and How to Efficiently Document Medical Necessity for Qualified Patients (.2 CEUs)
Oct. 7 | Track B | 8:00am – 10:00am | .2 CEUs

Description

Mobility Assistive Equip. – What’s Covered, What’s Not, and How to Efficiently Document Medical Necessity for Qualified Patients (.2 CEUs)
Dan Fedor, U.S. Rehab, Director of Reimbursement
This session will focus on coverage criteria for mobility products and accessories, outlining the difference of covered items, justifying medical necessity and non-covered items. In addition, the instructor a former Medicare senior manager will provide insight of what Medicare and other insurers look for to approve those covered items. Learning Objectives
1.     Identify covered and non-covered items
2.     Determine medical necessity for covered item
3.     Construct an effective wheelchair evaluation for to ensure reimbursement for qualified patients


Alpine Rehab Conference 2022